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Finding and dating unknown family photos

How great it would be to name so many people on a wedding photograph!

Somerset & Dorset Family History Society

Haymaking

As anyone interested in family history will know when facts come to light that enable a name to be added to a family tree it is not long before starting to wonder what this person might have looked like. Many of us will have photographs back to our grandparents and some are lucky to be able to go back to the great grandparents but beyond this it may well be much more difficult. It is often tricky too to travel out sideways as great uncles and aunts and all the associated cousins are likely to be very unknown quantities by now to a lot of us. When I started keeping my family tree electronically I really liked to be able to add a little thumbnail photo of identified relatives as this way they suddenly became a person rather than just a set of facts. Group wedding photos are a great…

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The Hwntw

This was a very popular public house in Bwlchgwyn, my great grandfather, Robert Belton, was the licensee for a while and I remember a few stories of life in the 50s that involve mention of The Hwntw. I never had a good picture then, out of the blue, I was sent this great picture. I couldn’t add anything to my old website at the time, but I always kept the picture until I could display it on this new site. So here it is, The Hwntw, and more or less as I remember it, too. (If you choose to  copy this into a FB group or other place, please be courteous and link back to my site). When this picture was taken the landlord was George Davies. There was a lovely pull-on place along the front of the building which facilitated all sorts of visitors from groups of cyclists to the occasional charabank on a day excursion.  Thank you, PB!

HWNTW ARMS from Phil Brown

Joynt, Our Family History, Uncategorized

Liverpool Workhouse Registers

A few days ago I went with David and his cousin and her mother to Liverpool Central Library, mostly to look for David’s Joynt records; each one of us had some research questions to try and answer whilst we were there. The filmed Workhouse Registers for 1859-60 were easy to find and we had good reason to think that the elusive ancestor might have spent a night or two, at least, in the workhouse, but he wasn’t to be found amongst any of the records. Other people were found, though, including a Joynt that we hadn’t seen before. Not finding someone in a record set does close one line of enquiry, that is a result of sorts. We continue the search.

Liverpool Building, Liverpool
Pier Head, Liverpool.